Neutering Cats

Neutering Cats

Neutering of all male and female cats should be seriously considered if you do not intend to breed with them. In an ideal world every kitten would have a good home with a caring owner, but sadly this is not always the case.

Because the procedure is carried out under general anaesthetic you will be instructed to keep your cat indoors and starve it overnight. Your cat will be admitted first thing in the morning and the neutering procedure will be done later that morning. You will be able to pick up your cat later in the afternoon of the same day. Recovery is generally quick with sutures (female cats only) being removed after 10 days.

SPAYING (OVARIO HYSTERECTOMY)

This is performed on female (queens) to remove the ovaries and uterus.

CASTRATION

This is performed on males (toms) to remove the testicles.

ADVANTAGES OF NEUTERING

Neutering of male and female cats is strongly recommended to control the cat population and prevent the transmission of certain infectious diseases.

Most female cats will try and escape when in season and there are many roaming entire males waiting for this opportunity.

When male cats have been neutered it is often the case that they are less likely to stray and their urge to fight becomes weaker. They are also less likely to show territorial behaviour such as urine marking.

DISADVANTAGE OF NEUTERING

One of the most common concerns after neutering is the problem of weight gain. However, your cat should not put on weight as long as you feed it sensibly. It is a fact that they will not require as much food after the surgery to maintain their ideal weight. We will send you a letter six months after your cat’s operation inviting you to one of our free nurse clinics to monitor your cat’s weight and give any advice necessary.

WHEN SHOULD NEUTERING TAKE PLACE

The breading cycle of the cat means that from an early age (5 – 6 months) they can give birth three times every year throughout their lives. We therefore recommend that 6 months is an ideal time for male and females to be neutered.

Should you wish to discuss any of these issues in more detail, please consult your veterinary surgeon.